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Chamberí neighbourhood guide - where to live in Madrid

Francisco Peres

Chamberí is a traditional 19th century neighbourhood in Madrid’s city centre. It’s locals are really proud of the small-town feeling you get in Chamberí: it’s wonderfully slow, relaxed and you don’t see many tourists around. It really kept the genuine and authentic Madrileño atmosphere.

Plaza de Olavide Chamberi

Chamberí’s Plaza de Olavide by Eduardo (tnarik)

Friendly & Welcoming

The neighbourhood attracts a mix of people: the locals who have always lived here and would never move, young professionals and plenty of Spanish and international students. Most people who arrive fall in love with the neighbourhood and stay here much longer than they thought: this means that the locals you meet – the waiters, bartenders and shopkeepers – will always make a little extra effort to remember you. By the second or third time you visit the same place, you’ll be given the extra-friendly treatment that all house-guests get.

Neighbourhood for Tapas lovers

You won’t find any trendy lounge bars around, but the tapas bars are great. The locals hit them at lunch time and then later at night to share cañas, tapas and news. If you don’t like beer, you can always ask for a tinto de verano (red wine, lemonade and ice) or a vermú (red vermouth – sometimes with olives). (Editor’s note: Maria wrote an excellent post explaining what Tapas are and listing the best Tapas you can ask for. Click this link to find out more about tapas.)

Student in Plaza de Olavide's street market

Check out the quirky street markets around Chamberí! – photo by Yukino Miyazawa

Transportation

There are five metro stations close to the Chamberí neighbourhood. Quevedo is the closest metro station: it’s on the handy Line 2 Vodafone line, which crosses the whole city, past central Puertas del Sol, across Ventas and all the way to Las Rosas. Iglesia is nearby, too, on Line 1 that runs roughly North-South along most of Madrid. San Bernardo (lines 2 and 4), Bilbao (lines 1 and 4), and Alonso Martinez (lines 4, 5, and 10) – this means the neighbourhood is well connected to the whole of Madrid.

Rental rates

Living in Chamberí isn’t one of the most affordable neighbourhoods in Madrid. Moving to Chamberí, you’ll probably live in a spacious bedroom in a large apartment. These large flats with several rooms are very commonly converted into student residences. A simple residence room’s rent tends to float somewhere between 350 and 450 a month. Smaller residences will have higher prices. Also, the closer you get to the Gran Via, the more expensive apartments and accommodation tend to be.

Blue Calle Trafalgar in Chamberi

Calle Trafalgar is one of Chamberí’s main streets – photo by Yukino Miyazawa

Fact sheet: Chamberí

One place to eat: Strawberry Fields, Tapas and Pop culture combined in a cool little place.
Address: Calle de Carranza, 11

One place to drink: Bar Café Arco Iris, a very typical tapas bar and esplanade in the Plaza de Olavide – great beers, and awesome tapas if you feel hungry.
Address: Calle de Palafox, 22

One place to study: One of the best places to study in Madrid – the Biblioteca Central.
Address: Calle Felipe el Hermoso, 4

One thing to see: The Ghost Station in Chamberi, an abandoned metro station that was recently recovered.

One thing to do: Kick back on a sunny day with your friends around a table at Plaza Olavide – order some drinks, enjoy some tapas, and let the good conversation take over your afternoon.

Interested? Check out our neighbourhood page about Chamberí, with all the available student accommodation listed there!

Thanks for reading this post! We hope to see you soon, coming back for more. Did you enjoy our article about where to live in Madrid? Do you live in Chamberi or are you considering it? Just drop us a line in the comment section below. And remember! If you need to find student accommodation in Madrid – or you know someone that does – you’ll find the student home you’re looking for on Uniplaces.com.

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